NoBullART Free Art Gallery

Tuesday, August 9th 2016   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com
I recently read Popism, the Andy Warhol '60s and was inspired to begin a new series of Pop-inspired everyday objects. With the produce I've been growing and selling, what better place to begin?

"Ten Watermelons" is a 22" x 28" gouache on canvas panel. The original is available for purchase. Just message me!

Go to my online gallery to order cards, photographic prints, posters, canvas and framed prints, cards, and free E-cards.

Wednesday, July 6th 2016   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com
This painting was done completely on location under one of my favorite trees in our side yard. I was inspired by the simple scene of the dogwood trees sunlit from behind.

Wednesday, July 6th 2016   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com
Here on summer vacation, I'm sure we all have a long To-Do list of household tasks. But who would rather paint the house, than paint a picture of it? This painting was started outside plein aire and quickly sketched. Then I finished inside in the studio.

A challenge and my focus was to capture the different "layers"of distance.

Tuesday, July 8th 2014   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com
Can't Read the Email?

Click HERE.

Although I've been on a sort of "hiatus" for a while, I have some interesting developments in my art world that I wanted you to know about. I hope you check them out...

Buy Prints and Cards Directly

When I look at the list of galleries and shops around the state that have carried my work, a shocking number of them are out of business! In today's world, we're used to just ordering what we need right on the internet. To follow the trend, you can now order my prints and cards directly from my website via Paypal. Items for sale on my prints and cards pages have Add to Cart buttons, and you can shop the entire site and add what you wish. The prices are lower to allow for shipping. What I have in stock is priced to sell! Now you don't have to find my artwork in a shop or gallery; just order directly from me! If you're someone I see regularly or locally, I will refund shipping if you're picking them up.

Save the Healing Springs Springhouse!

I still remember seeing the Healing Springs spring house for the first time in western North Carolina. It was so beautiful that I had to paint it. Sadly, since then the structure sustained significant damage from a falling tree.

The new owners of the property have launched a fundraiser to raise enough money to restore the spring house to its former glory. To assist with the effort, I have donated this original painting and they're using the image as a part of the campaign. Please consider donating to help with this fundraiser.

The Ocean Series I have painted a series of tropical fish for a client and they're available online (but not from me). The first three are available and I'm working on a fourth (a sea turtle). Check them out! I'm considering beginning a tropical wildlife series, but am still in the planning stages.

Puzzles are Back! I had to reprogram my puzzles, but they're back at my site . You should try them. I've heard they're addictive! The puzzles include some of my popular whimsical animals and also a few landscapes and some of my other works.

My work still stretches across the state, including Boone, Winston-Salem, Greensboro, Salisbury, Asheboro, Topsail Beach, and the Tin Rooster in Louisiana. I am always looking for appropriate new galleries in other areas to exhibit my work. You can see a helpful map of where my work is found on my website at http://scottplaster.com. Until next time, I hope you enjoy! ---Scott PS: If you're receiving this email as a forward, you can subscribe yourself to this newsletter HERE. To unsubscribe, simply send me an email and I will personally remove you.
Sunday, February 12th 2012   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com

Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster offers FREE Online Whimsical Art Greeting Cards for Valentine's Day

Did know that over 12 million Valentine's Day cards will be mailed this year? That doesn't count the ones that are hand-delivered, or sent through the internet. Why not send a FREE e-card from ArtGreetingCardsOnline.com ? There are 6 so far to choose from using the whimsical artwork of Scott Plaster. Hallmark.com charges $12 for a subscription to its e-cards, and some of their cards cost $1 each. A paper card would cost you $2-5, a stamp, and a trip to the post office.

Guys, this could be your chance to send something not too threatening to break the ice! 

Send one of these early, and there'll be time to get one back!

While you're at my site, you can check out online puzzles (also free), and my current exhibits.

Send a Card!

Happy Valentine's!

----Scott

http://scottplaster.com

Thursday, November 24th 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com
Hello All,

I haven't offered any new online cards lately, so since I had a little time today, maybe those of you that are online and can't visit everyone you'd like today -- can send a card or two to share those sentiments.

I have three cards to choose from, so check them out!

CLICK HERE to choose one and Send. 

---Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster

http://scottplaster.com
Sunday, August 14th 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com

"Squirlie" -

 first in an ongoing series of commissions

Meet Squirlie, my first fish in Project Scuba.

I've been busy this summer. I just finished a new website for a non-profit organization, which will be unveiled soon. Part of my "creative energies" go into website development, which means less time for painting. But meanwhile I've had time to make headway on a very exciting art project. Let's call it Project Scuba.

Project Scuba began when I was contacted out of the....blue by a local businessman entrepreneur named David. I'm very easy to find on the internet, and David was specifically looking for a local NC artist who specialized in animals. David and his wife Sara are avid scuba divers and they soon came up with a novel idea for a niche market. Scuba divers always  bring home souvenirs from their trip -- everything from cards to hats to T-shirts. So instead of have their choices limited to imported trinkets, why not create a high-quality line of products using fine art images?

I was selected because of my "whimsical" treatment of my subjects. I have done a few seascapes and marine life, including my "Crab in Space." David and his wife were anxious to see how I would create similar creatures with the tropical fish that divers see on Caribbean reefs.

We struck a deal for a series of commissions and the rest is history. We've chosen four fish to get us started. David and Sara are getting not only the original paintings out of the deal, but reproduction rights, leaving me the initial sum plus royalties.

The first painting in the project is called "Squirlie," a squirrel fish commonly found on scuba trips. David says it's like "a glamour shot of a fish" with the its lighting effects and treatment. Sara said she wanted the fish to look friendly, while I wanted to make him look "squirlie." Squirrel fish are known not only for the squirrel-like tails, but their wary behavior.

If anyone is interested, prints are on their way, and there will be hats and T-shirts. I can forward your name and contact to David, who is setting up an online store and marketing these to dive shops.

The best part was that Therese and I went out to eat to celebrate -- Captain Tom's Seafood. Mmmmmm.

---Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster

http://scottplaster
Sunday, August 7th 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com

One of Wayne Plaster's unique pottery Barrels

From Father to Son Show at the Circa Gallery

Two father and son pairs were recently featured in a special exhibit at the Circa Gallery in Asheboro. You can read a full story about the show here:  Read the article in the Asheboro Magazine.   Scott Plaster still has paintings, cards, and prints remaining in the Circa Gallery as an ongoing exhibiting artist, and Wayne Plaster has some of his unique, handcrafted pottery barrels for sale.

Following are some pictures of the event:

--Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster

http://scottplaster.com

Sunday, July 24th 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com

Scott Plaster's Whimsical Art Cards Now at the Weatherspoon Gallery Gift Shop (WAM Shop)

I am pleased to announce that my greeting cards and notecard sets are now available at the Weatherspoon Art Museum gift shop. Manager of the shop, Kate, says she likes the modern and contemporary look of my Beetles and Flies cards, especially.

You should really go to this museum if you haven't been or haven't been lately. When I was there, I saw an incredible exhibition of Rackstraw Downes works, a showing of Matisse drawings, and a number of other great collections. What a great museum! It's no wonder that it has over 30,000 visitors a year....

You can see the gift shop in the picture below, right at the back entrance amid this beautiful architecture.

My Puzzles on Android!

I hope you can check it out!

--Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster

http://scottplaster.com

Saturday, July 23rd 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com

My Puzzles are Now on the Android Market FREE

The Gist:

I wanted to announce the availability of "PZL ME: Whimsical Art," the Android phone version of my art puzzles. As far as I know, I am the very first (or among the very first) contemporary artist using Android technology to promote his work. On a similar note, if you go to my website at http://scottplaster.com on a phone, you will also notice that you are taken automatically to a MOBILE version of my website, which is much easier to use on a phone, but still has all of the same content!

The Details:

Hello, everyone. Most of you that know me personally know that I love gadgetry, and some of you that know me best, know that I love it tooooo much sometimes! But, Android phones these days are definitely "where it's at." These pocket computers are changing, and will continue to change, our lives. I find myself not even wanting to pick up my laptop unless I really have to. My email is easier on my phone, for example.

Many of you have used the online puzzles on my website, and I thank you! But what if I said that similar puzzles are also available now for your Android phone or tablet? This all materialized because I saw a really nicely done puzzle application on the market, and I contacted the developer (in Bulgaria). We worked out a mutually beneficial arrangement -->> My content and his Programming!

All you have to do is scan this code with your phone and it will go directly to the download page. Alternately, you can go to the Android Market and search for "Whimsical Art".

I think you'll really like these. They track how you do on the puzzles, make it easy to set the degree of difficulty, and you can also use the same application for turning any picture on your phone into a puzzle.

My biggest puzzle fan has already tried some, and she wouldn't give my phone back!

For anyone who doesn't recognize the QR barcode here, you probably don't have an Android phone, or haven't had one for long. These are scanned by the phone and automatically to go a website link, or can even contain messages! You will be seeing these pop up all over the place as more and more people equip themselves with this new technology. If you do not have an Android phone, then get one. But if you don't, and want to enjoy my puzzles, you can always just

use them on my website

.

I hope you enjoy.

--Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster

http://scottplaster.com

Screen Shots from PZL ME: Whimsical Art

Saturday, July 16th 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com

Laura Farrow's "Crying Man"

Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster Joins DAG

A few weeks ago I was honored to be invited by the Director (Taj Forer) personally to join the Durham Arts Guild (DAG). Taj is an internationally recognized photographer with work all across the US and Europe. He came across my work and asked me to join, and I was thrilled!

The DAG is among the five oldest arts guilds in the entire country. They have two gallery spaces in downtown Durham. It has members from across the state.

Therese and I went to the opening of the Annual Members' Show and we were so impressed with the quality of work. I'll have a few exhibition opportunities (seasonal open shows, a juried show, and the chance to apply for a solo), and I'm really excited to be a part of such a talented, diverse group. Here were some of our favorites from the show:

Lilly Langer's "Fields of Red Clay"

Crystal Lee's "Kim"  

Dave Milkereit's "Bull City Ride"

Derrick Bryant's "First Sunset"

Detail of "Man Crying"

Deborah Younglao's "Lotus Field"

Crystal O. Hardt's "The Barefoot Girl"

Great Turnout!

What a talented group of artists!

--Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster

http://scottplaster.com
Friday, June 17th 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com

NEW Father's Day Cards: "From Father to Son" Special Exhibit

To commemorate the upcoming "From Father to Son" Special Exhibit at the Circa Gallery opening Friday, June 17th ( Details HERE ), here is another Father's Day card featuring my whimsical art on my FREE Online Greeting Card site.

I hope you check them out. Your father deserves a card (even if it IS free -- it's the thought that counts, right?).

Send a Card NOW

---Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster

http://scottplaster.com
Monday, June 13th 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com

NEW Father's Day Cards: "From Father to Son" Special Exhibit

To commemorate the upcoming "From Father to Son" Special Exhibit at the Circa Gallery opening Friday, June 17th ( Details HERE ), here is another Father's Day card featuring my whimsical art on my FREE Online Greeting Card site.

I hope you check them out. Your father deserves a card (even if it IS free -- it's the thought that counts, right?).

Send a Card NOW

---Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster

http://scottplaster.com
Friday, June 10th 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com

Plasters featured in Denton Orator: From Father to Son – two Denton artists show their heritage

This article featured 

Week of June 10

When artist Scott Plaster took his father on a surprise trip to the Pisgah Covered Bridge in Randolph County it was the first time his father Wayne had been. What Wayne did not know at the time was that Scott had visited there several months earlier, photographed the bridge, and then painted an original watercolor painting for him as a gift. On the day of this surprise trip, Scott unveiled the painting, which he had hidden in the trunk of his car. It was Father’s Day, and Scott had wanted to do something special for his father as a way to pay him back for years of support during his early growth as an artist.

This type of tribute is what the “From Father to Son” special art exhibit opening at the Circa Gallery in Asheboro is all about. The Circa Gallery is the premier gallery in the area, showcasing the best work from artists and craftsmen from around North Carolina. The show will kick off at the start of Father’s Day weekend during the third Friday celebration on June 17 at 5 pm, and will feature the diverse artistic creations of two father and son pairs, the Plasters, along with a second father and son pair. The exhibit will showcase works from these four gentlemen as a way to show the artistic lineage of their creative endeavors. Although their work is in different media, the ties and influences show some interesting connections in subject matter, style, and treatment.

Scott Plaster began creating art at a very early age, mostly due to this father’s influence. Plaster recounted, “My daddy would draw these Picassoesque basketball players with long flowing arms and I would paint them in with those paints from the little blue jugs. Instead of guns and video games, I would get art supplies for Christmas.” Those early paintings and drawings stayed with Scott through his moves throughout NC, then VA, then to Bristol, VA, where they ended up mistakenly in an estate sale. The story of how he got those “priceless” early works back was recently featured in a Fox 8 News Buckley Report (go to http://tinyurl.com/scottonfox8 to watch it online).

Scott graduated as valedictorian from the first graduating class of South Davidson in 1989, then graduated with a Master’s degree from ASU in Boone. After exploring two other careers (IBM and internet consultant), Scott now teaches reading at Lexington High School, where he says he has found his true calling. He began exhibiting and selling his work as an artist when he moved back to NC and began his teaching career. He now has his “whimsical” animals and other artwork in over a dozen galleries, shops, and boutiques across the state. He has sold his work in numerous group and solo shows, and markets a full line of cards, prints, and framed reproductions. His website at http://scottplaster.com even features online puzzles and free e-greeting cards. Scott’s “Blue Al” will be seen on display for the first time in this exhibit, along with some other works never shown before, including some earlier works Plaster painted before he began creating his whimsical artwork.

Scott’s father, Wayne Plaster, didn’t start work as a potter until he retired from teaching over 15 years ago. Wayne taught in the NC public school system for over 30 years, spending the majority up until his retirement at Denton and South Davidson High Schools. Many people in Denton remember him as their history teacher or their baseball or basketball coach. He now serves as a Denton Town Commissioner and still lives with his wife Sue in their home of over 40 years. Since he began working with pottery, Wayne has trained with some of the best potters in the entire Southeast at the Randolph and Montgomery community colleges, including Mike Ferree and even a special workshop with Phil Morgan. Wayne has sold literally hundreds of pieces at festivals and shows across Central NC. He has regular customers who visit his booth every time he exhibits at Apex, Asheboro, Denton and other shows. Wayne often double-dips his glazes, sprays or drips them on, and has even created some pieces with hard-to-create crystalline glazes.

Wayne is known for his unique creations, and it’s not uncommon to see other potters repeating his patterns once they see them. “It’s always funny to see the other potters walking up to my booth. They’ll pick up one of my pieces and look at it really closely. By the next year, there will be four other potters doing the same thing,” he explained. He creates vases and bowls, but his realistic-looking barrels, textured burlap bread bowls, elephant tea pots, oil lamps, and praying angels are what keep his customers coming back time and time again.

The artistic tradition in the Plaster family goes back more than two generations. On display at the Circa Gallery will also be some creations by Thomas Albert Plaster, the father of Wayne and the grandfather of Scott. These include hand-carved miniature chairs and a chain carved from a single piece of wood, with no breaks. The youngest Plaster actually learned the artistry of basket weaving from his now-deceased grandfather when he was a young boy. As a teenager, Scott made baskets for family members and even sold them at crafts stores around Boone, but since then has reserved his creative talents for painting. People probably wonder if Wayne and Scott will ever combine their creative efforts, but Scott said, “He leaves painting to me, and I leave the pottery to him because he’s the one who does it best. At some point, we may join up and I’ll paint some hand-crafted tiles or plates he creates. That really would be a great way to partner with our art!”

The other father and son pair in this special exhibit share an equal artistic connection. Father Perry Boswell is an art teacher in a public high school, but creates his unique “historical” collages for galleries and venues across the Triad. His 19-year-old son Brennen joins his father in the exhibit, adding his abstract themes he creates from acrylic and multimedia. Brennen says he feels proud to be joining his father in this special exhibit.

The father to son heritage that used to be so crucial in the “crafts” era is still alive and well in these fathers and sons. The original (not for sale) “Pisgah Covered Bridge” painting will be on display, with prints for sale. The drive is not that far away from Denton for this chance to see the first exhibit this father and son pair have ever had together. Wayne and Scott say they might be convinced to reminisce a little on old times after the show at a local Chinese restaurant to make your drive well worth the trip.

Don’t miss this special exhibit, “From Father to Son,” on Friday, June 17 from 5 to 8 pm at the Circa Gallery in Asheboro. The show is free and open to the public. Check Scott’s website at http://scottplaster.com for details and a link to the Facebook event.

Monday, June 6th 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com

Memories Lost and Found: My Early Work - the Final Chapter

Sometimes we get lucky, very lucky. The artwork I had done in my first stages as an artist and kept with me for years, move after move, I thought was gone forever. Because of the kindness and generosity of one young man in particular, I was able to get that work back. If you haven't kept up with the story, you can read how it unfolded in Part I and Part II .

Now I have those early works on display at a gallery in Mebane , and have created an online "virtual" gallery showcasing them. The story was featured in a lengthy article in the Asheboro Magazine and was the subject of Bob Buckley's "Buckley Report" on Fox 8 News (WGHP).

Please peruse these links to learn about the whole story:

Read    ~   Watch    ~     See

---Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster

http://scottplaster.com

Monday, June 6th 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com
Check out the two newest artists at Favorite Whimsical Artists:

Enjoy! ---Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster

Whimsical Artist Thaneeya McArdle

Whimsical artist Thaneeya McArdle is an internationally collected artist who has been creating art for as long as she can remember. The passion for her art shines through in all her work, from the abstract to the photo-realistic, but especially in her whimsical art. Her philosophy is embodied in her image below. ART ShOuLd B E :

In addition to her personal art site below, she also has a great whimsical venture at

Art is Fun.

Website:

Learn more about Whimsical Artist Thaneeya McArdle .

Whimsical Artist Pristine Cartera-Turkus

Whimsical artist Pristine Turkus calls herself a "a modern Folk Artist." She loves scribbling, painting scenes that catch her eye and ideas/memories that move her. Her paintings of folk art angels, mermaids, seascapes, flora and fauna, and musical instruments are colorful, fun, and captivating. Turkus is a self-taught artist living in Huntington Beach, California and also an Interior Designer.

She began using her artwork as accessories for her client's houses, stores and offices. When she started posting her work online a few years ago, she gained an audience of admirers and buyers around the country and even world. Her artwork is done in mixed media (oil, acrylic and ink) and she likes using joyful, whimsical colors. She says, "the most common comment I hear regarding my work is that my artwork just makes people smile."

Turkus is often solicited for commissions and has sold her art all over the world.

Website:

Learn more about and buy art from Whimsical Artist Pristine Turkus .

Monday, June 6th 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com
Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster Featured in Fox 8 News Buckley Report

I was recently featured in Bob Buckley's report on Fox 8 News (WGHP). In case you missed it, here it is online:

 

An article about this subject appears in the May issue of the Asheboro Magazine:

"When I got that email, my heart sank! I couldn't believe it," said whimsical artist Scott Plaster about the recent recovery of his early, childhood work. Back in February, Plaster got an email from someone in Bristol where he used to live. Harry's email just said, " I volunteer at a thrift store in Bristol VA which has recently acquired several of your early works! Some of which are dated as far back as '85. They were out for sale at the store when we started going through them and examining them more closely. That's when we removed them from the sales floor and contacted you!" The worker had tracked down Plaster through the internet and his website (he is easy to "find"). Plaster is an artist well-known for his line of "whimsical animals" and exhibits and sells his work all over the state of North Carolina. His work has been featured in newspapers, magazines, and even a feature segment on Fox 8 news. He's been painting for over 30 years, but has only marketed his work for the past few years. What "secrets" does his early work show about Plaster as an artist?

What makes this story so fascinating is the extent and breadth of this early artwork. Plaster had kept his sketches, drawings and paintings for literally years, from before the age ten on through his young adulthood. Plaster first started oil painting at the age of nine, and is largely self-taught. All kept neatly catalogued in a brown cardboard storage box measuring approximately four feet long by two feet wide, this early work followed Plaster wherever he went, like archeological treasures...

---Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster

http://scottplaster.com

Read the Whole Story!

Monday, June 6th 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com

Winners: "Most Whimsical Cat or Dog" on Fine Art America

Does anyone else create anything they consider 'whimsical'? I started painting these whimsical animals and now I can't stop! I suppose other subjects can be whimsical, but nothing has more character than animals...  

Our last contest was for the Most Whimsical Dog or Cat; you'll see the winning images below. 127 whimsical artists participated and submitted their whimsical art!! I'm happy to say that 'Cry Baby' put on a great online marketing campaign during the contest and came out victorious. Congratulations to the other winners and ones who came in with a number of votes. 

Here are some really great whimsical artists. You should check them out:

2nd Place:

"Crazy Cat lady" 

      by Arvind T Akki             

3rd Place:

"5 Cats"  

by Pristine Cartera Turkus

Honorable Mention:

"Pathetic Persian Gets a Bath"

 by Kerra Lindsay

---Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster

http://scottplaster.com
Monday, June 6th 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com
NEW Father's Day Cards: "From Father to Son" Special Exhibit

To commemorate the upcoming "From Father to Son" Special Exhibit at the Circa Gallery opening Friday, June 17th ( Details HERE ), I created SIX online Father's Day cards featuring my whimsical art on my FREE Online Greeting Card site:

I hope you check them out. Your father deserves a card (even if it IS free -- it's the thought that counts, right?).

Send a Card NOW

---Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster

http://scottplaster.com
Monday, June 6th 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com

At the Crossroads in Bristol: How Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster Got His Lost Work Back

UPDATE: Scott featured on Fox 8 

Watch it ONLINE

This article appears in the May issue of the Asheboro Magazine:

"When I got that email, my heart sank! I couldn't believe it," said whimsical artist Scott Plaster about the recent recovery of his early, childhood work. Back in February, Plaster got an email from someone in Bristol where he used to live. Harry's email just said, " I volunteer at a thrift store in Bristol VA which has recently acquired several of your early works! Some of which are dated as far back as '85. They were out for sale at the store when we started going through them and examining them more closely. That's when we removed them from the sales floor and contacted you!" The worker had tracked down Plaster through the internet and his website (he is easy to "find"). Plaster is an artist well-known for his line of "whimsical animals" and exhibits and sells his work all over the state of North Carolina. His work has been featured in newspapers, magazines, and even a feature segment on Fox 8 news. He's been painting for over 30 years, but has only marketed his work for the past few years. What "secrets" does his early work show about Plaster as an artist?

What makes this story so fascinating is the extent and breadth of this early artwork. Plaster had kept his sketches, drawings and paintings for literally years, from before the age ten on through his young adulthood. Plaster first started oil painting at the age of nine, and is largely self-taught. All kept neatly catalogued in a brown cardboard storage box measuring approximately four feet long by two feet wide, this early work followed Plaster wherever he went, like archeological treasures...

Read the Whole Story!

Monday, June 6th 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com

At the Crossroads in Bristol: How Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster Got His Lost Work Back

This article appears in the May issue of the Asheboro Magazine:

"When I got that email, my heart sank! I couldn't believe it," said whimsical artist Scott Plaster about the recent recovery of his early, childhood work. Back in February, Plaster got an email from someone in Bristol where he used to live. Harry's email just said, " I volunteer at a thrift store in Bristol VA which has recently acquired several of your early works! Some of which are dated as far back as '85. They were out for sale at the store when we started going through them and examining them more closely. That's when we removed them from the sales floor and contacted you!" The worker had tracked down Plaster through the internet and his website (he is easy to "find"). Plaster is an artist well-known for his line of "whimsical animals" and exhibits and sells his work all over the state of North Carolina. His work has been featured in newspapers, magazines, and even a feature segment on Fox 8 news. He's been painting for over 30 years, but has only marketed his work for the past few years. What "secrets" does his early work show about Plaster as an artist?

What makes this story so fascinating is the extent and breadth of this early artwork. Plaster had kept his sketches, drawings and paintings for literally years, from before the age ten on through his young adulthood. Plaster first started oil painting at the age of nine, and is largely self-taught. All kept neatly catalogued in a brown cardboard storage box measuring approximately four feet long by two feet wide, this early work followed Plaster wherever he went, like archeological treasures...

Read the Whole Story!

Monday, June 6th 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com

My Latest Whimsical Animal, "Blue Al"

This was a little time in coming, but I finally finished another oil painting, 30" x 40" "Blue Al."  This larger-than-lifesize hoot owl was photographed by friend Susan Boswell on her way to work in Davidson County.

The background was inspired by tree branches and a morning sky, creating a tapestry or stained glass effect. It uses four distinct shades of blue, with "branches" intersecting. The owl itself is stylized with simplified shapes and striking blue eyes.

The original is available for sale, and is scheduled to be on exhibit at the "From Father to Son" show at the Circa Gallery in Asheboro, NC in June, unless it sells first. Contact the artist directly until then for more information about owning the painting.

Prints and cards will be available.

As a whimsical artist, I'm excited to offer another creation to my line of whimsical animals.

---Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster

http://scottplaster.com
Wednesday, March 16th 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com

What does "Sauer's Kitchen" Have to Do with this Story?

Memories Lost and Found: My Early Work, Part II

For anyone who hasn't heard Part One of this story, here is a quick summary: A few weeks ago, I got an email from Harry, a worker at a thrift store in Bristol, VA. The owner had bought a stack of paintings at an estate sale and they tracked me down via the internet (I'm very easy to find). These works from years and years ago, mostly from my childhood and teenage years, I had accidentally left in a house when I moved away from Bristol, TN. These early works capture evidence of my early self-taught artistic development, memories of my early days as an artist, and even childhood memories. Before I could make the store an offer on the works, a saintly soul of an art lover bought them instead, and then HE tracked me down (I'm easy to find). We communicated and worked out a deal, and this is where Part Two of this story begins........

Johnny is a young businessman, traveler, entrepreneur, and yes, art lover. I wasn't clear when he first emailed me that he was a customer at the store, and not the owner. After all, a worker at the store really wanted me to be able to get my work back. His first contact to me through my website said "We  

recently acquired several of your early works! Some of which are dated as far back as 85.

 I suggested contacting you in case you would like an opportunity to look at what paintings and drawings we have.  Please e mail me back if you have any interest in viewing the collection."  The owner must not have been as willing. Only one day later, I got email from Johnny -- he beat me to it.

Fortunately, Johnny felt sympathy for my situation when I told them how I didn't mean to leave the paintings behind and what they represented to me. He said, " I was going frame them but now I feel terrible." I didn't want to "guilt" him out of the paintings that he rightfully bought. After all, he must have liked them to buy them! I told him, "

It would mean a lot to me if you could photograph them for me and send 

me the digital pics. . .then enjoy the artwork. . . Then follow my  current work. You will be one of my biggest fans."

It's when Johnny offered to send me back the work and repay him "some day," that I had an idea. Roughly midway between Bristol and my residence in Kernersville is an art gallery where I show my current work, Artwalk in Boone. The idea occurred to me, Why not work out a trade? I really wanted Johnny to have my work, and it would mean so much to me to get back my early work, so I proposed that he bring the work to Boone, leave it there, and take in its place, one of my more current works, "Sauer's Kitchen." It took some convincing, because he didn't want to take anything at all, but finally we agreed. Johnny made the trip one cold, rainy day last week.

I literally could NOT wait to get to Boone and retrieve what I had considered "lost forever" all these years. What would it be like to see it again in person (and not just in my memory)? My girlfriend Therese and I made the trip this Saturday to Artwalk, and also to take care of some other art business there. It was perfect timing. We arrived that afternoon and an employee got them out of storage where they had been keeping them safe.

What would I think of my early efforts? Would I remember them? What memories would come back of when I had created those works 20 and 30 years ago? Therese and I thumbed through them one at a time, hovered over the hood of my car. Sketches, pastels, finished paintings -- spanning from age 10 to my early adulthood -- an entire stack that chronicles the early stages of my artistic journey. Was the whimsical artist there all along?

Do we see these traits in the painting to the left?

What did we find in that stack of drawings and paintings?

Read more next time....

---Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster

http://scottplaster.com
Sunday, March 6th 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com

A Whimsical View: Local artist adds personality and color to his canvas of oils

by Wendy Freeman Davis

Originally appeared in the Kernersville News, March 1, 2011

For Kernersville artist Scott Plaster, the whimsical nature in which he portrays his subject matter can probably be traced back to his childhood when painting the Picasso-esque drawings he remembers his father drawing on manila sheets of drawing paper.

It wouldn't be until years later into adulthood, however, that Plaster recalled that whimsical images on canvas when he took out his paints to recreate a photograph of a lone cow he'd taken while travelling the Blue Ridge Parkway.

Thus was born the "Cosmic Cow," now namesake of the Triad area group of artists he leads who banded together in support of one another's work about three years ago.

Plaster's whimsical depiction of this particular cow wasn't one of tradition. Instead, it took on a shape and character of its own beyond a realistic portrayal and standing in a sea of flowing green. Other animals have followed -- from funny ducks with bills protruding to his own cat caught mid-yawn -- and while some are more realistic than others, all stand out in vivid color on canvas.

"Something just clicked," Plaster said of the time he spent creating his "Cosmic Cow" painting. He had spent years searching for his own artistic identity and somehow in that moment Plaster found it. "I knew something was different about it from the start," Plaster continued.

Plaster grew up in Denton, the son of teachers -- his mother in English and his father in history. He was only a toddler when his father first began bringing home basic student tempura paints for him to use. By the time he was 10 years old, Plaster had graduated to more sophisticated oil paintings, taking inspiration from the likes of Van Gogh, the French Impressionists, and even North Carolina artists Bob Timberlake and Andrew Wyeth.

For the emerging artist, Christmas became about what art supplies he would get rather than the latest in boyhood gadgetry. "When some kids were waiting for video games and toys from Santa Claus, I was eager to get paint, canvas and pastels," recalled Plaster. As he grew into his teen years, Plaster immersed himself in magazines devoted to art and learning about styles, techniques, and art history.

One might assume that Plaster pursued art into his college years, maybe as an art education major or art history, but that assumption would be wrong. Plaster did go on to college at Appalachian State University but pursued both his undergraduate and master's degrees in English rather than art.

As far as Plaster was concerned, his career would always be teaching while art would remain something he did for the pure joy of it rather than as a job. "I've always wanted to keep art separate," Plaster said. "I'm a self-taught artist and by keeping the two separate, it lets me do the kind of art I want to do."

That's not to say he doesn't love his job as a reading teacher at Lexington High School in Davidson County. After teaching English for four years at Ledford High School, Plaster has been the reading specialist at Lexington Senior for the past two years. "I really like doing what I do as a reading teacher."

Like most emerging artists, Plaster had his turn at a variety of day jobs before finding a teaching career. He's been an education specialist for IBM in Raleigh and has worked in sales, advertising and custom website development while living in Virginia and Tennessee.

Plaster moved back to NC in 2005 and has lived in Kernersville for the past three years. His reasons for moving here centered around logistics. "I deliberately chose Kernersville because it's right in the middle of the Triad and galleries in Winston-Salem and Greensboro," Plaster explained. "I wanted to stay right in the middle."

Plaster's artwork can be seen at a plethora of galleries and artistic venues across the region and NC, including being a hosted artist at several Kernersville festivals. That kind of street level exposure is one of the reasons the Cosmic Cow Society was born. "Our main thrust is finding non-traditional venues, like coffee shops or restaurants, for our work," explained Plaster. "The average person has never stepped foot in a gallery. We want to bring art to the average person."

While the society's membership is open to artists in all of central NC, it remains a small, close-knit group with only 12 members. Those accepted into its ranks must first go through a trial period to see how well a fit they would be to the group. "We have artists in all different stages of their artistic development," said Plaster. "We have a few professional artists and others like myself with day jobs to pay the bills."

Eventually, Plaster envisions retiring from teaching and moving to the coast where he can pursue his art full-time. Its a goal he only work toward. "By the time I retire, my goal is to be a full-time artist," Plaster said. "I'd love to have the freedom to own and run a gallery."

Plaster has an interesting approach to marketing his artwork. "I feel like in today's economic climate, money is so tight that the average person can only afford the basic essentials. I do not want that fact to be a barrier to enjoying my art and having it seen by the community." Plaster has created several offerings that are absolutely free to the public in order to get exposure f or his work. One is his line of free online greeting cards that feature his whimsical artwork. He had over 6 00 cards "picked up" over the Christmas holiday. He also had many people use his Valentine's Cards. So, far he has featured each major holiday and even has birthday cards, a get-well-soon card, and an engagement card. You can find a link to his cards from his website.

Plaster also offers interactive, drag-and-drop puzzles  using his artwork. Some users have even called them "addictive." Plaster's site offers seven puzzles t o choose from. "I want people to see my work, even if they can't afford to buy it. Today, people need something 'whimsical' to make them smile or laugh, and my artwork can give them that!"

Those wishing to see more of Plaster's original artwork can visit his website at http://scottplaster.com .

Artist Scott Plaster has found his niche painting colorfully whimsical animals, like the image entitled "Beatles - John"

Tuesday, February 22nd 2011   -   By: Unknown   -   scott-plaster.blogspot.com

"Study in Sienna" - watercolor in monochrome

Memories Lost and Found: The Hopeful Recovery of My Early Work

This is a story about Memories "lost and found" and makes you ask the question, what are those artifacts really worth? What is art really worth? What are memories worth?

It is a complicated story with a few twists, but it's the most interesting thing that's happened to me in a while. I've been creating art for at least 30 years, so it all started years back when I stored some of my paintings and drawings in a box under my bed. It was a long, 4-foot long cardboard storage box and had everything from sketches to some completed pastel, colored pencil, watercolor, and even oil on panel. Many of my earliest works were among them, carefully stored for years, following me with every move into my adult life, from Denton to Boone to Raleigh to Holly Springs to Richlands to Bristol. And then where?

"Mountain Sunset" - an early 12" x 16" oil on panel

I had a troubled time when I lived in Bristol, VA and had amassed an extension collection of furniture, books, memorabilia and other belongings, including art supplies, vintage frames, tools and supplies, and completed paintings. I packed to move and had to move quickly to take a job. I had a dilemma. How could I take everything? 30-some years of belongings filling over 6,000 square feet....I had to make some choices. I even made a few trips back and forth once I had made the "big move," but still only made a dent.

"Reaching Out" - pencil study

I moved mainly what I needed and could sell for money, including a single bedroom of furniture, my art essentials, only the choicest books, and my clothing. I sold the remaining belongings (everything left in the house) to an investor. I did not realize it until it was too late that among those items was that box of my early artwork. Nothing could replace that. It was gone. And so I adjusted to the fact that all of those memories and traces of my early artistic development were gone forever. All I had left was the memories.

Fast forward nearly 10 years. I got an email from a thrift store employee saying that the owner had bought at an estate sale a stack of artwork signed by me (presumably) and dating back to the 1980's. Was it me?

I gasped when I read the email! I couldn't believe it. At once I felt thrilled, cheapened, frustrated, angry, and anxious. I wasn't even dead, and my former belongings had gone through an estate sale. I'm not a dead, famous artist, and already my "early works" are being pilfered through to see what is worth "saving." This store employee I am extremely grateful to for contacting me. He had the decency and respect that I would want anyone to have in this situation. This was obviously an intimate collection of artwork, and not just a few pieces from a collector. This employee even took pictures for me, and from these rough photos I contorted and reconstructed the few images you see here. I was told how much the owner had paid, and although it wasn't the price of a newly discovered Vermeer, it wasn't a drop in the bucket, either. It was a large enough amount for me to have to think whether it would be worth it to pay for these items that I had lost through my own fault and doing. I had, after all, already "said goodbye" to them.

During the day, so many thoughts stirred in my head about these issues. What value would these early pieces have to anyone? I didn't and don't even consider them anything other than "student" pieces. It was years before I considered my work Good Enough to market. These early works, in my mind, were just as well lost and gone forever, for no one to see. Now that I look at them retrospectively from 20+ years in the future, maybe I can view them with a more objective eye. In the "Study in Sienna," I see skill in the rendering, in the perspective, and the treatment of the objects. I have no idea where I got the original image or idea from. It kind of reminds me of a Vermeer, actually. I wouldn't have had access to an antique drop-leaf table, so I can only assume I saw this image in a book.

In the "Mountain Sunset" I can see the bravado of the brush strokes and the bold use of color. I like the use of tonal and aerial perspective and I think the clouds are nicely rendered. Not bad for a 9th-grader, I think to myself! And lastly, although I do not consider myself a good "drawer," in the pencil drawing "Reaching Out," I can see the bold use of line and expressive nature of this work.

Can I look back at these early works and say that at an early age I had a natural "talent"? That is such a sticky question, because as soon as you call something a talent rather than a skill, you nearly deny the ability that these qualities can be taught or learned. I would conclude in compromise and say -- that I had an "aptitude" and that at an early age I spent hours and hours developing it, mostly on my own and in the dark ages before the internet -- through books and the Artist's Magazine. You can learn more about my early stages in an online interview HERE .

The last chapter of what happened to this treasure (to me) of my early artwork hasn't quite been written. Let's just say it may end up with a happy ending. I sure hope it does.

I will be sure to let you know.

---Whimsical Artist Scott Plaster

http://scottplaster.com

Please tell me your comments about this story by posting below!



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